Paul Leyland

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  • in reply to: DART spacecraft impact with Dimorphos #612730
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    It was fun to watch and some of those observing from the ground did quite well too…

    https://twitter.com/fallingstarIfA/status/1574583529731670021?s=20&t=bSNlZJgGJmZCFPEEcFqEvA

    3 tonnes of TNT appears to have made a pretty impressive cloud of debris.

    Well, it is (or was) a loosely bound rubble pile according to the images returned so perhaps it is not too surprising that a lot of rubble was thrown out.

    in reply to: map of light pollution trends #612527
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Interesting. It seems to tally with my experience of the last four years in La Palma. Los Llanos is below my horizon, though still visible because I am at a significantly higher altitude, but has become markedly brighter. Everywhere else is much the same. I was mildly surprised to see a hint that my sky may have become slightly darker.

    A Major problem for me is the increased frequency of calimas, the local term for Saharan dust clogging the atmosphere.

    in reply to: Just Curios, What’s Your Smallest Scope? #612506
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    I have a planetary image in the gallery taken with a 2.2mm f/1.8 refractor …

    https://britastro.org/observations/observation.php?id=20191209_191900_36b00eba365581f4

    Perhaps this is cheating, but it is still a refractor telescope by essentially all definitions.

    in reply to: Tracking RR Lyrae pulsations spectroscopically #612338
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    I am impressed!

    Real science being done.

    in reply to: Globular Cluster Marathon #612234
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    As expected. Opened up the observatory at sunset and took a few snapshots of the moon. By the time that the sky was half-way dark all that could be seen was the moon and a sky full of moonlit cirrus.

    Mañana perhaps.

    in reply to: Globular Cluster Marathon #612233
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Since writing that GC article, I have discovered that another GC has been added to the zoo: Minni 22 which is located at 17:48:51.4 -33:03:40. It is quite small, with a half-light radius of 1.1 arcmin, and in a very crowded part of the Milky Way in Scorpius. This is why it went undiscovered until 2018. As it happens, it is well placed here for tonight and as long as clouds don’t intervene I intend to have a go. By the looks of the DSS images, I don´t expect it to look like anything other than a MW star field but hope to pick up some of the stars mentioned in the discovery paper https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/1538-4357/aadd06/pdf

    Won’t be easy, but we do these things not because they are easy but because they are hard.

    in reply to: Possible fade of RY Sagittarii #612223
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Back up to 7.526V (0.007) on August 30.875

    Last night’s oservations were hindered by cloud and not yet analysed.

    in reply to: Artemis #612157
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Dec is fine from here in LP but whether the sky is clear is another matter. The rainy season is beginning and there is thick cloud tonight.

    in reply to: A gravitationally lensed supernova SN 2022qmx at z=0.35 #612144
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Some crude photometry has now been done. For comparisons 100 stars within 2 arcminutes of 2022qmx were searched in Gaia EDR3; their positions, G magnitudes and errors therein were saved. These and 2022qmx were analyzed with APT 2.8.2

    The magnitude at JD 2459817.361, aka 2022-08-25 20:40 UT, is reported as 20.02 (0.02).

    Crude, because my images were unfiltered but have been shown to be a decent match to Gaia G by and large.

    in reply to: A gravitationally lensed supernova SN 2022qmx at z=0.35 #612138
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    And here is mine. About an hour in total unfiltered. Extremely crude stacking. I am sure a much better image will become available.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Paul Leyland. Reason: Fix typuo
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    in reply to: A gravitationally lensed supernova SN 2022qmx at z=0.35 #612132
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Still there. Imaging it right now. Eyeball guess is about 19.0 mag but there is a chance that I may have confused the star with a neighboring EDR3 entry of similar magnitude. Precise measurement should clear it up tomorrow.

    Pictures to follow.

    Paul

    in reply to: FITS to animated GIF #612037
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Thanks. I have the GIMP and have used it in the past for minor image manipulation but never thought of using it for making animated GIFs.

    I will give it a try but find its complexity and learning curve intimidating. 8-(

    in reply to: FITS to animated GIF #612029
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Paul,

    I think that PIPP, designed for lucky imaging crowd, can do animated gifs. The creator says it can be enjoyed with WINE.

    https://sites.google.com/site/astropipp/

    David

    Thank you, I will check it out.

    The reason for my request is now public at https://britastro.org/observations/observation.php?id=20220819_140838_474d0d65ddd59b61

    Paul

    in reply to: Comet’s Tale No. 41 #612017
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    What a coincidence, I have just been looking at JWST! Pictures to follow.

    in reply to: Antitwilight Sky #612006
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    The “blue belt” is also known as the “Earth shadow”. It can be very impressive at times.
    The “belt of Venus” corresponds to the red shades seen towards the opposite direction in the sky. It comes from back scattered red light.

    in reply to: Phew, that’s a relief! #611665
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Looks like it came down near Borneo.

    If so, I hope the local authorities issue the Chinese with a fine for littering.

    in reply to: CG Dra: a VSS campaign #611508
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Please keep up observing and the pattern matching.

    It seems very likely to me that outbursts are somewhat predictable, it is just that we don’t yet know how to predict them with much reliability.

    in reply to: JWST Mirrors #611486
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Implementation: extra mass, cost, complexity and failure modes all have to be weighed against the benefits of adding them.

    Not worth it, in other words.

    in reply to: Betelgeuse’s colour changed in the last 2 millenia #611414
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    Oh no, not again. You can not be Sirius!

    Get your popcorn ready. This should be entertaining when the other astrophysicists start laying into it. (Though the claimed 5.1σ is interesting.)

    in reply to: An old brass refractor. #611413
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    I found that but haven’t reported it. Earlier today I found some broken image links, which I have reported. You may wish to check the links in your own pages.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 498 total)