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SUN HALPHA 20191130 1110-1141UT PROM CFB

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Observer
Carl Bowron
Time of observation
30/11/2019 - 11:10
Object
Sun
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Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
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Solar diagram 25-11-19_20191126_0001

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About this observation
Observer
Monty Leventhal
Time of observation
25/11/2019 - 21:20
Object
Sun
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Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
John Chuter's picture

Dark skies: A journey into the wild night

Tiffany Francis, who is familiar with the starry skies above the South Downs where she lives, may already be known to some readers as a writer on food (Food you can forage), the natural world and the need to protect it. In this latest book she tells of travels around Britain and Europe in search of both daytime and night-time landscapes.

John Chuter's picture

Gerard P. Kuiper and the rise of modern planetary science

Gerard Kuiper (1905–1973) was one of the greatest, most controversial astronomers of the twentieth century and effectively the father of modern lunar and planetary science. His name is commemorated in the Kuiper Belt of comets, asteroids and planetisimals at the edge of our solar system, as well as by craters on the Moon, Mercury and Mars. Remarkably however, until now there has been no major biography of this influential figure.

John Chuter's picture

The Universe explained – a cosmic Q&A

‘From America to Australia, China to Columbia, the Q&A session of our lectures is often the best part.’ So begins the introduction to this ambitiously titled book from the prolific writing team of Heather Couper and Nigel Henbest, which proceeds to pose and answer questions with all the conversational enthusiasm of such an event.

John Chuter's picture

Sky Notes: 2019 December & 2020 January

(Written for 22:00 UT in the UK on January 1.)

Looking east we see that Leo has now risen, whilst ahead of the lion – travelling westwards along the ecliptic – we find Cancer and Gemini. The former contains M44, often referred to as Praesepe or the Beehive Cluster, which is visited by a waning gibbous Moon in the early hours of Jan 12 when a number of occultations take place.

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DWB 111 - The "Propellor Nebula"

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About this observation
Observer
Graham Roberts
Time of observation
07/09/2019 - 22:30
Object
DWB 111
Observing location
Redhill, Surrey, UK
Equipment
William Optics GT81 + Focal Reducer FL 382mm f4.72
ZWO1600MM camera
Exposure
22 x 300 sec Ha, 8 x 300 sec OIII & SII
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In a quest to find and image new targets Graham's curiosity was drawn towards a more obscure catalogue of HII emission nebula, in particular DWB 111, AKA Simeis 57 or The Propellor Nebula.  The object was first catalogued in the early 1950s by the Crimean Astronomical Observatory at Simeiz, Ukraine as number 57 of a total of 306 HII regions!  Then in 1969 H.R. Dickel, H. Wendker and J. H. Bieritz (DWB) developed a catalogue of 193 optically visible HII objects in the Cygnus-X region of the Cygnus constellation, which included DWB 111.  Strictly speaking the Propellor consists of DWB 111 & 119 with other close-by features DWB 107,108, 118, 125 & 126.

Whatever the nomenclature, locating DWB 111 was difficult but Graham eventually found and installed the necessary data.  The target is located between Vega and Deneb, which at this time of the year tracks northwest directly above his observatory, meaning imaging is confined to just about 2 hours due to local obstructions.  Graham concentrated on imaging the Ha wavelength, with only a few SII and OIII subs, which are both weak in nature.  However, the results speak for themselves and Graham has presented three separate versions for consideration.  I chose the SHO version, but the others show a wealth of additional information and they can be seen on his website at 

https://watchthisspaceman.wordpress.com/2019/10/12/fabric-of-reality/

Numerous filament-like threads produce fascinating structures which run throughout the nebulosity, making for a truly exciting image. Additional integration time is planned for the future.

Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
BAA BAA Update

Improvements to our Member Services

We are pleased to announce a new online portal that lets you check and update your contact information online. This is part of a migration to a new membership database provided by SheepCRM.

Sheep login

https://app.sheepcrm.com/britastro/login/

At this time you will need to setup a separate login to access your details. When creating this account you will need to enter the email address the office holds for you, this is the email address we use to remind you about your renewal each year. When requesting an account Sheep will send you an email to this account to verify it was you who made the request, to ensure only you can access your personal data.

We are also replacing the old join and renewal pages, and we are implementing a better payment system. We received some comments about our old PayPal interface as it appeared to ask some members to setup PayPal accounts. Therefore, we have replaced PayPal with the Stripe payment interface for payment or renewal of BAA subscriptions. There is no need to set up a third party account. For the present the shop will continue to use PayPal as altering the Shop is not a trivial task.

There are benefits behind the scenes from this migration, as it will enable us to automate many of the frequent and time-consuming manual tasks performed by the BAA Office. This will reduce the risk of mistakes and free up office staff to work on other tasks.

Many months of planning and work has gone into getting this right. However, if you spot any problems then please let us know by contacting the BAA Office at office@britastro.org.

Please note that this change only affects subscription payment and renewal. The way you logon to the BAA website remains the same. Simply use your old username and password to login to https://britastro.org/user/login to access member only content, like the online Journal and Handbook, and to upload observations to your Members Page.

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