British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

Dominic Ford's picture

The historical significance of Mount Stromlo Observatory

Number: 
84
2003 Jan 21 - 21:09

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00084            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Further to the note on [BAA 00083] concerning the destruction of the Mount

Stromlo Observatory we have received a short article from Dr. Wayne Orchiston.

Dr. Orchiston is the secretary of IAU Commission 41 (History of Astronomy) and

his article reviews the historical significance of the various instruments at

the site.



The article can be found on the BAA website at:



http://www.britastro.org/news/stromlo1/



Nick James. Papers Secretary.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Jan 21 21:09:48 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Mount Stromlo Observatory

Number: 
83
2003 Jan 20 - 19:56

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00083            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Dear BAA Members,



It is with considerable regret that I must inform that the Canberra

bush-fires have destroyed the historic Mount Stromlo Observatory with

the loss of all the major telescopes.



The initial news was sent to me by the Reverend Bob Evans in Australia

who will be familiar to BAA members as the discoverer of many

supernovae.



It is a relief that although staff were only given 20 minutes' notice to

evacuate, there was no loss of life. However other sources suggest some

lost their homes situated on the observatory complex and our sympathy

and best wishes go out to them at this terrible time.



A message is also being sent to Elizabeth Budek, President of the New

South Wales branch of the Association.



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 20 19:56:03 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Observers' Workshop 1

Number: 
82
2003 Jan 19 - 14:45

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00082            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





British Astronomical Association's Observers' Workshop 1



The Hoyle Building,The Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge

See http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/IoA/IoAmap.html

Saturday 2003 February 15th

Doors open at 10.00 am

Entry is free to BAA and non-BAA members



The Workshops are intended to encourage amateur observing, both for fun and

ideally scientific benefit. Many of you will observe the heavens already,

but these Workshops will help develop skills and introduce observers to new

disciplines. The speakers will endeavour to be around for enough time on

the day of the Workshops to discuss their area of expertise more

informally.



10.30 Ordinary Meeting

10.45 An introduction to the Workshops - Guy Hurst and Nick Hewitt

11.00 Why observe variable stars? -  Karen Holland

11.50 Imaging comets  - Martin Mobberley

12.45 Lunch

14.00 Visual observations of Jupiter  - John Rogers

14.50 Photometry of Minor Planets -  Nick James

15.40 Tea

16.20 Measuring Double stars - Bob Argyle

17.10 Observing Variable Nebulae  - Nick Hewitt

18.00 Close



The times and order of talks may be subject to change.

For details of other Workshops, maps of each venue, and more details of

speakers, see www.britastro.org and follow links to the Meetings page

Any queries - e-mail Nick_Hewitt@compuserve.com



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Jan 19 14:45:25 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Jupiter satellite phenomena

Number: 
81
2003 Jan 10 - 20:33

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00081            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





May I draw observers' attention to the multiple and mutual phenomena of

Jupiter's satellites, which will be fascinating to observe and record

whether visually or by imaging.  One series occurs tonight, and an even

better series a week from tonight.  Full details are in the BAA Handbook.

Here are brief summaries of the events of most interest for observers in

the UK and western Europe:



Jan.9, 01.27--07.23:  III and I in transit together with their shadows,

preceded by mutual occ. 00.32-00.52.  Did anyone catch these events?



Jan.10/11, 20.29-23.27:  II and I in transit together with their shadows,

and mutual occ. (19.03-19.38) and ecl. (20.54-21.22), just as they begin

transit.



Jan.17/18, 20.38--02.46:  IV, I, and II  in transit together with their

shadows, and mutual occ. and ecl.  Previously II eclipses I twice

(16.38-17.18 and 19.24-20.16). Then IV occults both I (00.51-01.05, while

in transit) and II (04.50-05.12).



Jan.19, 01.01-01.10:  IV occults III.



Observers producing CCD images are urged not to apply too much processing

as this produces contrasting rings around satellites and their shadows

which would mask the true appearance of the phenomena.



_________________________________



John H. Rogers, Ph.D.

Jupiter Section Director,

British Astronomical Association.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Jan 10 20:33:52 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Quadrantids

Number: 
80
2003 Jan 01 - 17:13

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00080            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









Observing Opportunity - Quadrantid Meteor Shower 2003







Active each year between January 1-6, the Quadrantids are among the three

most productive annual showers. Rates at maximum, usually on January 3-4,

can reach one or two per minute, corresponding to corrected Zenithal Hourly

Rate 120. The maximum is usually very short-lived, with the highest activity

seen in a roughly six-hour time span. This means that opportunities to

observe the shower at its best only come round once every 3-4 years, when

the maximum is favourably timed, for a given longitude.



     In 2003, maximum should occur at Solar longitude(2000.0) = 283.1o,

close to January 3d 22h UT. This is quite favourable for the British Isles.

At the time of maximum, the radiant (at RA 15h 28m Dec. +50o) in northern

Bootes will be quite low in the northeastern sky. As shown in the table

below, however, it rises rapidly in the hours through midnight, and by early

morning is high in the east. Good observed rates should be found in the

early morning hours.







Table: Quadrantid Radiant Altitudes at 53oN







Local Time   Altitude        Local Time   Altitude



19h                  14.4o          01h                   27.0o



20h                  12.8o          02h                   33.4o



21h                  12.7o          03h                   40.9o



22h                  14.2o          04h                   48.8o



23h                  17.1o          05h                   57.4o



00h                  21.5o          06h                   66.3o







It has been some time since this shower was last well covered by BAA

observers - hardly surprisingly, the Quadrantids often fall victim to poor

weather conditions. Visual watch data obtained by the Meteor Section's

standard methods (described on the Meteor pages of the BAA website at

http://www.britastro.org) will be welcomed by the Director at the address

below.



    The 2003 shower may prove productive for photography, especially after

midnight UT on Jan 3-4. Past returns have shown bright Quadrantids to become

more numerous in the hours after the visual peak.



     With the Perseids and Geminids both blighted by strong moonlight, the

Quadrantids offer the best chance for a night of high-activity meteor

observing in 2003, and observers are encouraged to make best possible use of

any clear skies to cover this favourable return of the shower: the last time

we were able to accumulate large amounts of data won the Quadrantids was as

long ago as 1992!











Neil Bone



Director, BAA Meteor Section



'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7DZ



01243 782679     neil@bone2;.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Jan 1 17:13:49 GMT 2003

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Christmas Greetings/Office Closure

Number: 
79
2002 Dec 24 - 12:02

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00079            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dear BAA members,

May I thank all those who have supported the Association and myself over

the last 12 months, many working quietly behind the scenes to ensure

everything runs smoothly from day to day.



I must also remind you that our office is now closed and will re-open on

the morning of Monday, 2003 January 6.



If there are any really URGENT matters during that time (such as

potential discoveries) please refer them to the appropriate director or,

if unavailable, please e-mail details to myself at:



president@britastro.org



Finally may I wish you all a very Happy Christmas and clear skies during

2003.



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 24 12:02:03 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Comet 2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa)

Number: 
78
2002 Dec 17 - 12:49

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00078            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



A revised orbit is now available for the new comet and an ephemeris is on the

section web page at the address below.  The new orbit has a larger perihelion

distance, so the maximum brightness is likely to be around 0th magnitude.  It

should become a naked eye object in the new year and will be visible from the

UK

into the third week of January.  After perihelion it will return to UK skies in

March as a binocular object.



The co-discoverer is Shigehisa Fujikawa who found the comet on December 14.86

using a 0.16-m reflector.  This is his 5th comet, the others being C/1969 P1

(Fujikawa) C/1970 B1 (Daido-Fujikawa), C/1975 T1 (Mori-Sato-Fujikawa) and

72P/Denning-Fujikawa.  He was also an independent discoverer of C/1968 H1

(Tago-Honda-Yamamoto), C/1968 N1 (Honda) and C/1988 P1 (Machholz).



The comet has been found on SOHO SWAN images, suggesting that it is not in

outburst and therefore quite likely to perform well.



A printed BAA Circular will be published shortly, giving an ephemeris and

finder

chart.



Jonathan Shanklin

j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, England

http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds



British Astronomical Association, Comet Section

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 17 12:49:26 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

The Christmas Meeting

Number: 
77
2002 Dec 15 - 20:00

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00077            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The Christmas Meeting of the British Astronomical Association



This will be held at the St Bride Institute, Fleet Street, London of 2003

January 4th at 14:30



The programme includes:-

"The Big Bang "  Professor Joe Silk, Savilian Professor of Astronomy,

University of Oxford

"Sky Notes" Martin Mobberley

"Astronomers and Oddities - the RAS and its Library"  Peter Hingley,

Librarian, RAS



Tea will be available at approximately 15:50. The meeting is free to BAA

members and non-members alike.

For more details, and a map to help find the venue, see the BAA web page at

www.britatro.org



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Dec 15 20:00:54 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

New comet 2002 X5

Number: 
76
2002 Dec 15 - 13:01

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00076            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Japanese observer Tetuo Kudo discovered a bright comet on December 13.83

using 20x120 binoculars.  Initially reported as 9th magnitude, some observers

report it as bright as 7th magnitude.  It has a coma perhaps 5' in diameter

with a faint tail. No definitive orbit is yet available, and for

current positions check the NEO Confirmation page at

http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/NEO/ToConfirm.html. The comet is circ...

from the UK, lying in Hercules.[IAUC 8032, 2002 December 14]



Some preliminary orbits have

been calculated.  A direct solution suggests the comet will pass close to the

earth and rapidly move south, so that UK observers will only be able to

follow it for another week.  The retrograde solution suggests a small

perihelion distance, with the comet becoming quite bright.  Both solutions

suggest that the comet could have been found a month ago, possibly suggesting

an outburst, particularly as it was not visible in SOHO SWAN images.



The discovery immediately contradicts my comments at the RAS meeting on Friday

and in Astronomy Now, where I said that I thought that 2002 O4 (Hoenig) might

be

the last amateur visual discovery.



Jonathan Shanklin

j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, England

http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds



British Astronomical Association, Comet Section

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Dec 15 13:01:13 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dominic Ford's picture

Leonids 2002 report

Number: 
75
2002 Dec 02 - 22:28

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00075            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









Preliminary Results from the 2002 Leonids







Weather conditions proved somewhat mixed across the United Kingdom for the

keenly-anticipated storm peak of the Leonids, forecast to occur close to

2002 November 19d 04h UT. In the south of the country, particularly, fog and

low cloud were locally problematical. Nevertheless, clear slots were to be

fund, and in the past fortnight, the Meteor Section Director has received a

large number of reports. Scotland and the north of England seem to have been

especially favoured.



    The expected high activity did occur, perhaps slightly later than

forecast (around 04h 10m UT). Observed rates were held back somewhat by

strong moonlight; several observers have reported counts around 10 Leonids

per minute. Bright meteors were reasonably abundant, but there was no

obvious excess of fireballs. From early analysis, a mean Leonid magnitude

+1.2 is found.



     Cunts have been binned in 5-minute intervals and scaled up to

Equivalent Zenithal Hourly Rates (EZHRs) allowing for sky brightness and

radiant elevation, as listed below. Population index r = 2.00 has been used.

These figures should be treated as highly preliminary, and will be revised

when time permits a more detailed examination of the incoming data.







UT           EZHR                             UT           EZHR



0302.5      356.5+/-134.7                0402.5    1542.1+/-206.1



0307.5      201.0+/-100.5                0407.5    2818.8+/-246.3



0312.5      694.4+/-185.6                0412.5    1557.9+/-187.5



0317.5      489.7+/-154.9                0417.5      649.6+/-129.9



0322.5      290.2+/-118.5                0422.5      786.8+/-126.0



0327.5      235.3+/-105.2                0427.5      794.4+/-142.7



0332.5      350.1+/-109.7                0432.5      511.1+/-94.9



0337.5      230.7+/-81.6                  0437.5      523.2+/-102.3



0342.5      466.7+/-120.5                0442.5      351.7+/-94.0



0347.5      629.0+/-121.1                0447.5      324.9+/-90.1



0352.5      775.7+/-137.1                0452.5      248.7+/-78.6



0357.5    1070.5+/-139.4                0457.5      247.4+/-78.2







Reports from the United States suggest a similar peak at 10h 50m UT at the

second predicted Nov 19d maximum, with that display being predominantly

comprised of fainter meteors.



    Thanks are expressed to all who have submitted reports, some very

promptly. Each will receive a proper detailed reply in due course. Please

bear with me, I  am currently trying to keep up with a large volume of

incoming material!







Neil Bone



Director, BAA Meteor Section



'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7DZ



01243 782679     neil@bone2;.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Dec 2 22:28:19 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS