Bright meteor spectrum

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  • #574162
    Bill Ward
    Participant

    Hi,

    Been getting some good results recently. Caught an almost perfectly dispersed spectrum on both a narrow field of view experiment camera and a spectroscopy camera. Unfortunately quite poor near UV/deep blue focus. However the mid blue and green Fe lines are beautifully sharp.

    Video here https://t.co/Rypf9USCVM

    Nice!

    cheers,

    Bill.

    #580173
    Alex Pratt
    Participant

    Hi Bill,

    Another nice one for the archive of spectra.

    It looks like I recorded this meteor on my Leeds_N camera. Apparent mag 2, this far distant from the event. Ground plot and composite image attached. Is this your meteor?

    Single-station analysis suggests it was an Andromedid. If so, it is useful data on debris from comet Biela.

    Clear skies,

         Alex.

    #580175
    Jack Martin
    Participant

    Bill,

    Good work and well done.

    What software are you using to data reduce with ?

    Regards,

    Jack

    Essex UK

    #580185
    Bill Ward
    Participant

    Mmmm, could be, the time is spot on however the direction on cam 8 is quite a bit to the south azimuth wise. If I get time I might do a manual run through with UFO Orbit. I’ll keep you posted (Or if any other observations pop up….)

    Bill.

    #580186
    Bill Ward
    Participant

    Hi,

    I use the free spectroscopy package Visual Spec. It is much better than Rspec AND you don’t get stiffed for 100 bucks every time they decide to update it. Note, for legal reasons I stress this is my opinion only… 😉

    Cheers,

    Bill.

    #580187
    Alex Pratt
    Participant

    Hi Bill,

    A single station result gives good pointing direction but the distance vector is approximate, estimated from its likely ablation altitude.

    NEMETODE members are submitting their October data and we can now combine my observation with that of Mike Foylan (Rathmolyon, Ireland). Two-station analysis suggests it was a slow sporadic meteor of absolute mag -1. Do the following updated ground map and radiant plot match your meteor?

         Alex.

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