Theodorus Blethyn

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  • #583876
    David C Rayment
    Participant

    I first found Ann Blethin in the register on Ancestry when I was looking for another person. I made a note of 1614.  When I went back to examine the entry more closely I could not find her, which is why I only entered 1614 above.  She does not come up on the Ancestry index so if she is in the index she must be under a name other than Blethin or a close variant.  That said I later found Ann Blethin on the IGI as being baptised on 30 May 1614, which confirms what I saw. As the other children were baptized within a few days of their birth, Ann is likely to have been born after May 20 during the same year as her baptism. 

    #583879
    Jack Martin
    Participant

    Australia,

    Seems there was a 5th (first) child born 3 years after they were married, unusual as children are usually born soon after marriage.

    Blethyn’s telescope is signed ‘Theodorus Blethyn fecit’, so that’s how he spelt his surname.  

    What is IGI ?

    Thank you for all the information you have provided.

    Jack

    Essex UK

    #583881
    Jack Martin
    Participant

    Australia,

    Definitely worthy of further research.

    If Theodore was born in 1616, what was the life expectancy, when did he die, where is he buried, in a Church in Holborn possibly.   

    The links to Francis Godwin and Jonathan Swift are intriguing.

    Thanks for your efforts,

    Jack

    Essex UK 

    #583883
    David C Rayment
    Participant

    Nature does not always play ball.  However, there may be another child pre 1613 which I haven’t found.

    IGI = International Genealogical Index.  Back in the day this was a personal name index to mainly dates of baptism and marriage. It was on microfiche.  In the UK it was arranged in sets by county and showed the parish where each event took place.  The updated digital version can be accessed on familysearch.org.  It is a very useful tool, but with the best will in the world errors do occur, so it is always best to check the original document where possible.

    It would appear William (father of Philemon) was the first to only use the Blethyn surname instead of the previously used Bleddyn.

    #583887
    David C Rayment
    Participant

    You say the telescope is signed with the name “Theodorus”. Interestingly, and at the risk of confusing matters, Wikipedia has “Theodorus” as the Dutch equivalent of the English and French “Theodore”. Welsh is “Tewdwr”.  Is there a Dutch connection?

    Did Theodorus actually make the telescope or does his name simply refer to the artwork?  Does the type of art work give any clues to the telescope’s origin?

    Blethyn mentioned above was baptized as Theodore, not Theodorus. However, “Theodorus” may have been used as a marketing ploy due to the popularity of telescopes in the Netherlands at the time. 

    #583889
    Roy Hughes
    Participant

    As you might suspect Tewdwr comes into english as Tudor. There was a good welsh/english name thanslation table available on the Find My Past website. Proved very useful understanding my own family history. Wonder if the ..us ending might just be a latinisation, cf. Kopernik/Copernicus.

    Roy.

    #583890
    Jack Martin
    Participant

    Australia,

    To the best of my knowledge Theodorus made the telescope.

    I don’t know about the artwork.

    Notice the coat of arms above his signature what does that tell us ?

    Jack

    Essex UK

    #583891
    David C Rayment
    Participant

    Yes, you may well be right, especially as a Latin term is used after the name.  I wonder what inscription is on the other two telescopes.

    #583895
    David C Rayment
    Participant

    Thanks for posting the picture – very interesting. I downloaded the image from the website and put it through Photoshop but unfortunately I am unable to make out any details on the shield.  My first thoughts are it relates to Blethyn or, as I think more likely, it relates to the person who commissioned the making of the telescope. Either way, it’s a new angle to research.    Is there a motto below the shield and if so what does it read? No need to translate. Having actually seen the item would you describe the dark red in the picture as purple?  Do you know if the other two telescopes show a shield/crest etc, and is the colouring the same?  

    I think it may be worthwhile you contacting Jill Campbell, the archivist at Knebworth House.  If you tell her you are writing an article about the telescope she may be able to tell you when and by what means Knebworth House obtained it. Often such places will itemise such objects in stock checks or keep a record of items given to them. To know the date it was first recorded as being at the house could prove useful, as would be the name of the donor, if there was one. I expect it would take her sometime to find that information, if she can.  Her e-mail address is on the Knebworth House website.  Go to, About Us/Archive. You could also ask her about the motto, which should be a quick and easy question to answer, if you do not already have that information. 

    #583906
    Jack Martin
    Participant

    Australia,

    I would describe it as purple.

     I don’t know if the other 2 telescopes show a shield/crest.

    I have already corresponded with Jill Campbell, unfortunately she does not know anything about the origin of the telescope, how or when it got into the families possession.

    Jack

    Essex UK

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