Maps of Mars

Ebisawa : Mottoni : Frassati : Aeschliman : Peach : Adelaar : Lewis

A three-part map by Shiro Ebisawa (1957), with very detailed nomenclature appears below. This map is regarded, by the BAA Mars Section, as the standard reference for names, for the IAU map from the same era (below) contains too few names to be of real use. However, both are average representations of the planet, and Mars will never exactly resemble either map. Since the epoch of the 1950s, major and apparently semi-permanent albedo changes have occurred in the Casius–Boreosyrtis region, and the curved feature at the E. side of the Syrtis Major, Nepenthes, has not been seen since the decade of the 1970s. Mario Frassati’s more recent map (below) gives a better impression of those areas. Large versions (1900 x 3000 pixels).

The standard IAU map by G. de Mottoni (1957), based upon the best available photographic work from the 1940s and 1950s. It shows all the detail visible with small apertures, and is good for quick reference. Large version (2060 x 2200 pixels).

The map drawn by Mario Frassati (2001) for the Unione Astrofili Italiani. It is based upon that organisation’s work during 1988–99, and shows the principal features of Mars at the 1999 opposition. This is a convenient up-to-date reference chart, though the most currently useful maps will always be those that appear in the BAA apparition reports. Large version (1500 x 800 pixels).

Makoto Adachi’s newly drawn albedo maps (completed Spring 2022) bring the classic Ebisawa map of 1957 up to date, and offer versions with or without the classic nomenclature. We have been given permission by Adachi to upload the maps here. The maps consist of three sectors of the planet either with or without Ebisawa’s telescopic nomenclature. (The Director gave some help with checking of the latter.) These new maps fall under the headings of “MRO public image” maps, which are the best resolution maps (with and without names), or “Mars Maps for visual observation”, which are presented at reduced resolution so as to closely confirm to telescopic observation. North up and south up versions are available. In a significant addition to the Ebisawa map, Adachi also presents N. and S. polar projections.

Map by MRO No Names 1
Map by MRO No Names 1
Map by MRO No Names 2
Map by MRO No Names 2
Map by MRO No Names 3
Map by MRO No Names 3
Map by MRO With Names 1
Map by MRO With Names 1
Map by MRO With Names 2
Map by MRO With Names 2
Map by MRO With Names 3
Map by MRO With Names 3
Map for Observers No Names 1
Map for Observers No Names 1
Map for Observers No Names 2
Map for Observers No Names 2
Map for Observers No Names 3
Map for Observers No Names 3
Map for Observers with Ebisawa Names 1
Map for Observers with Ebisawa Names 1
Map for Observers with Ebisawa names 2
Map for Observers with Ebisawa Names 2
Map for Observers with Ebisawa Names 3
Map for Observers with Ebisawa Names 3
Map for Observers North Pole
Map for Observers North Pole
Map for Observers South Pole
Map for Observers South Pole

Two maps of Mars (north at top) prepared by Ralph Aeschliman, originally published in Sky & Telescope (2003 June), and reproduced here by kind permission of the artist. (Upper) classic nomenclature; (lower) modern nomenclature. Large version (1200 x 1200 pixels).

A general map of the planet (south at top) with telescopic nomenclature added, prepared by Damian Peach from his CCD images of 2005 October–November. Most of the albedo features have not changed much since 2005, though Pandorae Fretum has been the most variable feature in the following years, as it waxes and wanes according to dust storm activity. Large version (2284 x 840 pixels).

Comparative Mars apparition charts for 2005 and 2007, compiled by Jan Adelaar from his images obtained 2005 October 6–November 9 and 2007 November 15–December 30. These maps appear in the second interim report of the 2007 opposition. (No larger version.)

          

Map by Martin Lewis, 2012. Large version (2000 x 846 pixels).

Select here to return to Section Programme.

Select here to return to the Section front page.

The British Astronomical Association supports amateur astronomers around the UK and the rest of the world. Find out more about the BAA or join us.