PHD Study Opportunity

Home Forums Exoplanets PHD Study Opportunity

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #574886
    Mark Salisbury
    Participant

    Hi

     If you are interested in or know someone who is interested in studying transiting exoplanets and helping commission a new remote observatory, there is an exciting new PHD opportunity with the OU in “Timing studies of potential ARIEL targets”.  The details can be found at the link below.  Post grad study with the OU is a rewarding experience working with some of the finest researchers in their fields in an extremely engaging and supportive environment that I can highly recommend.

     http://www.open.ac.uk/science/physical-science/sites/www.open.ac.uk.science.physical-science/files/files/A3%20KOLB%20Ulrich.pdf

     Mark

    #583827
    Rohit Korde
    Participant

    Actually I don’t have an academic background in astronomy and astrophysics but a keen interest for several years accumulating knowledge in various and broad aspects of astronomy. I have a masters in sustainable chemical engineering from Newcastle University, UK. Can I pursue a PHD in astronomy?

    #583828
    Andrew Smith
    Participant

    Very, very, tempting and would love to do it.  However, at 69 I should perhaps leave it to a younger candidate in need of the experience.

    Regards  Andrew 

    #583829
    Andrew Smith
    Participant

    This looks like an instrument  / programming task in the context of astronomy.  If your interested go for it.

    Regards Andrew 

    #583848
    Grant Privett
    Participant

    Got to say that looks fun, was seriously tempted, but I have too much going on despite (or perhaps because of) being now semiretired.

    Would suggest that the project is best suited to someone who programs for fun, is familiar with Python (well beyond the “Hello World” stage), has had previous experience automating equipment control and has very good attention to detail.

    When you think you have found all the ways a control program can fail, the real world has half a dozen more saved up for a rainy day.

    #583849
    Andy Wilson
    Keymaster

    If anyone is interested then I would not let age hold you back.

    I am fortunate enough to have returned to university in my late forties to do a PhD in astronomy. While I have seen more years than most of my fellow PhD students, I’ve met plenty older than me who only started once they retired.

    Andy

    #583850
    Paul Leyland
    Participant

    I’m also tempted, despite my age, but my itinerant lifestyle may make things difficult.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.