Supernova in M101 !

Forums Variable Stars Supernova in M101 !

Viewing 20 posts - 61 through 80 (of 86 total)
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  • #617644
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    I’ve added last night’s data (2/3 June) – see attached graph.

    B-V = +0.26

    Cheers
    Ian.

    #617672
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Morning!

    Here’s my updated mag. graph with last night’s results.
    B-V now +0.28

    Cheers
    Ian.

    #617677
    Robin Leadbeater
    Participant

    Here is a low resolution spectrum for the night 3/4 June. The continuum continues to cool and now matches a black body temperature of 9000K or an F0v star ((B-V) = 0.29.) The features are still weak with a very broad H alpha component with some structure evident at higher resolution. The higher Balmer lines are increasing in absorption blue shifted by ~8000 km/s

    #617733
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Hi all,

    Here is my updated mag graph from last night.

    B-V = +0.295

    Ian.

    #617759
    Kwong Man
    Participant

    Hello Ian,
    Thanks for your excellent imaging and analysis of the supernova. I was wondering, how you manage to get so much data, my skies are quite cloudy and even quite windy.
    Also how do you find the M101 so accurately, which software and platesolving software do you use ?

    Many thanks.
    Kwong

    #617764
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Thanks for your excellent imaging and analysis of the supernova. I was wondering, how you manage to get so much data, my skies are quite cloudy and even quite windy.
    Also how do you find the M101 so accurately, which software and platesolving software do you use ?

    Hi Kwong,

    Well, I have to say that I cannot remember a clear spell like the one we are having here in the UK at the moment! I don’t want to jinx it but it has been clear almost every night for weeks! I also have a remote observatory in Spain but the weather there has been terrible for weeks!

    I acquire my images using software called Sequence Generator Pro. This does all of the scheduling for my imaging runs and I use PlateSolve2 or ASTAP for my platesolving:

    https://www.hnsky.org/astap.htm
    https://planewave.com/download/platesolve2/

    Cheers
    Ian

    #617777
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Good morning,

    Attached is my updated graph up to last night (8/9 June).

    The B-V settled at +0.29

    Cheers
    Ian.

    #617792
    Robin Leadbeater
    Participant

    The spectrum is now showing increasing features more typical of type II supernovae (Broad P Cygni Balmer lines)
    Here is an example match in SNID to SN1980K 9 days past maximum

    Cheers
    Robin

    #617822
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Hi all,

    Here’s my updated magnitude plot as of last night (12/13 June).

    Cheers
    Ian.

    #617849
    Robin Leadbeater
    Participant

    A continuation of the animation of the spectrum. Part 2 covers 2023-05-27 to 2023-06-13 and shows the transition from an almost featureless spectrum to one showing more typical broad P Cygni Balmer lines
    https://britastro.org/observations/observation.php?id=20230614_144855_b767104d96087a30

    Cheers
    Robin

    #617855
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    A continuation of the animation of the spectrum. Part 2 covers 2023-05-27 to 2023-06-13 and shows the transition from an almost featureless spectrum to one showing more typical broad P Cygni Balmer lines

    Superb!

    I have attached my updated photometry graph with new data from both observatories last night (14/15 June).

    Ian.

    #617857
    Paul G. Abel
    Participant

    Due to cloudy skies I have only managed six observations- the one I made last night is included on the plot. Although it’s only six points it is enough to see the basic type 2 supernova light curve.

    #617955
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    It’s been a few days since I posted an update on the RVB photometry of supernova SN 2023ixf in M101. I’ve been away on holiday for a few days and haven’t been able to process my observations. Here’s my updated graph which still shows a gradual decline in magnitude and a widening B-V value. My data covers nearly 40 days so far…
    I was able to control my system at Pixel Skies Astro with my phone whilst I was in a boat in the wilds of the Norfolk Broads!

    Ian.

    #618044
    Jeremy Shears
    Participant

    There is a charming article about the discoverer of SN2023ixf in the journal Science:

    https://www.science.org/content/article/amateur-astronomer-may-worlds-top-supernova-hunter

    #618049
    Alan Thomas
    Participant

    Nice article, Jeremy. Thanks.
    Alan

    #618058
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Hi all,

    It’s been quite a few days since my last update but I have been manfully soldiering on measuring mags with the 3 RBV filters and I’ve barely missed a night!

    I was talking to Robin Leadbeater at the excellent BAA Comet Section Meeting yesterday whether he thought that SN 2023ixf was a Type II-L or Type II-P. We both agreed that, since there has been no sign of a plateau to-date, it must be a Type II-L. However, now I’ve added last night’s data all three colours seem to be showing the beginnings of a sharp bend to a flat line (see attached graph – look at the last 2 square points on each line).

    I’d be interested in any comments. Maybe the next couple of nights will tell!

    Best Regards
    Ian.

    #618076
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    Hi all,

    With regard to may last post. New data from last night reveals that the slow decline continues!

    Ian.

    #618683
    Robin Leadbeater
    Participant

    I see from the light curve the slow steady decline (~2 magnitudes in V over 70 days) has come to an end and the brightness is now dropping rapidly (~1.5 magnitudes in 12 days) This behaviour is similar to that seen in type II-P supernova following the plateau period so SN 2023ixf may have characteristics of both type II-L and II-P, similar to supernova like 2013by discussed in this paper for example
    https://arxiv.org/abs/1501.06491v2

    Cheers
    Robin

    #618686
    Mr Ian David Sharp
    Participant

    I see from the light curve the slow steady decline (~2 magnitudes in V over 70 days) has come to an end and the brightness is now dropping rapidly (~1.5 magnitudes in 12 days)

    Hi Robin,

    Yes, and it’s turned back up again! See attached graph as of last night’s data…

    Cheers
    Ian.

    #618689
    Jane Clark
    Participant

    Ian, I am tremendously impressed by your work following this supernova.

    In addition, I think we can make your “It’s turned back up again!” statement a little more quantitative. The rate of change over time of brightness (mathematical jargon term first time derivative of brightness) for all three colours is negative, and has been since about day 18. The rate of change of the rate of change over time of brightness (mathematical jargon term second time derivative) is what has changed sign in the last few days.

    It would not be difficult to plot these quantities, but to do so accurately would require your data, rather than my guessing the values with a printed graph and measuring calipers.

    • This reply was modified 11 months, 2 weeks ago by Jane Clark.

    Jane Clark

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