David Swan

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 302 total)
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  • in reply to: Wow! What an auroral display! #622830
    David Swan
    Participant

    Amazing.

    in reply to: Apparition of C/2022 E3 #615392
    David Swan
    Participant

    Development of ion tail into at least three streamers.
    MIDPOINT = ‘2023-01-29T20:59:22’ /UT of midpoint of exposure

    in reply to: Apparition of C/2022 E3 #615377
    David Swan
    Participant

    Captured this eve (midpoint) 2023-01-28T19:12. Lovely ion tail.

    Attachments:
    David Swan
    Participant

    Yes, that’s quite a rate of movement across the sky at Fri [corrected] 00:00 GMT. David

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by David Swan.
    in reply to: Apparition of C/2022 E3 #615346
    David Swan
    Participant

    Sleeker ion tail when imaged last night. The comet’s hood lends it the appearance of a speeding bullet.

    in reply to: iTelescope, New Mexico #615230
    David Swan
    Participant

    Mike and Martin,

    Your posts prompted me to have look just now: they have indeed moved!!

    You’re right Nick, there were / are some issues – I’ve seen a lot of hot pixels (not calibrating out), dead pixel columns and so on in my images. I’m less fastidious than you I suspect, so iTel is still more than good enough for me – for an astro fix when the weather is bad oop north. Let me know though if other remote observing solutions come your way – please.

    in reply to: iTelescope, New Mexico #615160
    David Swan
    Participant

    From Discord forum:

    mladen (iTelescope) — 10/01/2023 21:55
    Our apologies. Overhauling all scopes after many years of service. Estimated at around 10 days work. Our team is in New Mexico Skies, working around the clock.

    mladen (iTelescope) — 12/01/2023 22:13
    T02 (and all of New Mexico Skies) has been on extended maintenance from the 10th of January. This is scheduled to end by the 21st of January.

    in reply to: 2022 – how was it for you? #615049
    David Swan
    Participant

    Hello,

    I observed on 29 days of 2022. By far my best month was December, followed by October then January. Comets were my main target, but I did also take pictures of assorted transients, globulars and other DSOs.

    A poor year. But interestingly(?) I did observe on both the first and last days of 2022!

    David

    in reply to: Hello #612472
    David Swan
    Participant

    Hi David. All looks good! Welcome.

    in reply to: NOAA Active region numbers #612067
    David Swan
    Participant

    Nick,

    I am not a member of the solar section, nor am I an expert on these matters. You may want to look here though:

    https://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/sftheory/questions.htm#AR_numbers

    I’ve seen reference to a formal naming system for sunspots. Where can this be found?

    There is no naming or numbering system for sunspots. There is a system for numbering active regions, however. An active region can contain one or more spots. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) numbers active regions consecutively as they are observed on the Sun. According to David Speich at NOAA, an active region must be observed by two observatories before it is given a number (a region may be numbered before its presence is confirmed by another observatory if a flare is observed to occur in it, however). The present numbering system started on January 5, 1972, and has been consecutive since then. An example of an active region “name” is “AR5128” (AR for Active Region) or “NOAA Region 5128”. Since we only see active regions when they are on the side of the Sun facing the Earth, and the Sun rotates approximately once every 27 days (the equator rotates faster than the poles), the same active region may be seen more than once (if it lasts long enough). In this case the region will be given a new number. Hence, a long-lived active region may get several numbers.

    On June 14, 2002, active region number 10000 was reached. For practical, computational reasons, active region numbers continue to have only four digits. Therefore, the sequence of numbers is 9998, 9999, 0000, 0001, and so on. Active region number 10030, for example, is AR0030. This region will often simply be referred to as region number 30, with 10030 implied.

    in reply to: FITS to animated GIF #612028
    David Swan
    Participant

    Paul,

    I think that PIPP, designed for lucky imaging crowd, can do animated gifs. The creator says it can be enjoyed with WINE.

    https://sites.google.com/site/astropipp/

    David

    in reply to: Comet’s Tale No. 41 #612015
    David Swan
    Participant

    Comet spectroscopy

    JWST has been looking at the coma of C/2017 K2.

    Will be interesting to see the results!

    https://www.stsci.edu/jwst/phase2-public/1566.pdf

    in reply to: PR Her #610126
    David Swan
    Participant

    Likewise – negative for a PR Her outburst (8 May, 21:48 UT)

    Attachments:
    in reply to: Barred Spiral Galaxies #585183
    David Swan
    Participant
    in reply to: Following JWST through Orion to L2 #585171
    David Swan
    Participant

    Good research, Robin. I thought it must have been based on something. David

    in reply to: Following JWST through Orion to L2 #585167
    David Swan
    Participant

    I have just been catching up with the latest news on JWST in one of my favourite publications. This report, dated 26 Jan, suggests that one can spot the observatory in the bowl of the Big Dipper with binoculars. James Webb Space Telescope is seen from Earth as it settles into orbit | Daily Mail Online

    in reply to: Transient AT2018cow #585129
    David Swan
    Participant
    in reply to: Following JWST through Orion to L2 #585105
    David Swan
    Participant

    I’ve been following it closely: yes, quite amazing.

    in reply to: Following JWST through Orion to L2 #585070
    David Swan
    Participant

    New Year report from Tynemouth: windy conditions, with clouds scudding across the sky. JWST is still within reach of moderate equipment: I am able to pick it up on individual 10 second frames taken through an 8 in RASA. Frame 5 start 21:35:26; frame 67 start 21:45:57. I have enough frames to make a reliable (I think) estimate of brightness – I’ll plate solve and find some suitable comparison stars.

    in reply to: New Dwarf Nova in Gemini #585059
    David Swan
    Participant

    I estimated the brightness at about 12.595 CV, with a delta for the check* star (*corrected) of 0.021.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 302 total)